Great Lakes news: Nuclear waste risk and a former CEO sells a pristine island

English: Rocky shore of Lake Huron taken from ...
English: Rocky shore of Lake Huron taken from east of Port Dolomite, MI in the upper peninsula. (Photo credit: NarparMI via Wikipedia, CC, some rights reserved. Click on photo for copyright information.)

1. Nuclear waste risk to Lake Huron

A proposal to bury “low-level” and “intermediate” radioactive nuclear waste deep below the surface and less than a mile from Lake Huron is drawing opposition from many in Ontario, Canada and the state of Michigan. (Intermediate nuclear waste can remain radioactive for 100, 000 years.) Though the nuclear waste that will be buried near the publicly owned nuclear power plant is not the most dangerous sort, it still poses a risk for it would be buried in a porous limestone formation.

According to Michigan law,  nuclear waste cannot be buried within ten miles of a Great Lake. But Ontario has no such law. The Great Lakes are a major source of drinking water in the region.

Michigan’s U.S. Senators, Debbie Stabenow and Carl Levin, have asked the State Department to address the issue.

As a group of Canadians called Stop the Great Lakes Nuclear Dump points out, letting this deep nuclear dump go forward would set a precedent for other such deep dumps quite close to the Lakes.

2.  Former Super Steel CEO Fred Lubar sells St. Martin Island to the Nature Conservancy for $1.5 million

The Nature Conservancy has announced that it is in the process of purchasing 94% of an island off the northern tip of the Door Peninsula in Wisconsin.  (The island belongs to Michigan.)

St. Martin Island,  north of Washington Island, has been owned since the 1980’s by former Chairman and CEO of Super Steel Corporation, Fred Lubar. The Lubar family of Milwaukee is selling the land far below the fair market price, according to The Nature Conservancy.

The island is considered to be “critical stopover habitat” for migrating birds.

To help with the funding and care of St. Martin Island, the Conservancy is requesting donations which can be made right here on its website.

UPDATE (11/28)– Regarding St. Martin Island, in case you missed It the Journal Sentinel has a good article on the island and the sale.

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